5 Common Mistakes Everyone Makes in Email Marketing

Email Marketing

Email Marketing allows you to build a relationship with your contact at all stages of the conversion funnel. You can provide them with valuable information up until the final sale.

You may have noticed that the opening rate of your emails is low. It is frustrating to know that your email is not being opened by your intended audience.

We have therefore prepared five possible email marketing mistakes you may make when writing emails. These tips can help you increase open rates, decrease bounce rates and generate leads with your emails.

 

Send Email from real name

We expect to see the real person as the sender of an email. You may be sending the wrong emails if you include a company’s name.

Some recipients will not open these emails because they don’t feel a sense of closeness. corporate email is another aspect to consider.

Each employee must have a corporate email that follows the format: example@company.com. It is best to leave your email for contacts within your company, as the recipients of the emails will need to know that you are a representative of the firm.

 

Subject line

The subject line is one of the main factors that influence the opening of an email. It is the first part that the recipient reads to decide later if it interests them.

It is important to remember that your email will be competing with other emails in their inbox. You should make every effort to come up with a catchy subject line. When you create your email, make a list. It will help.

  • My subject line is simple and easy to understand.
  • It’s smaller and has less than fifty characters, so it won’t break on mobile devices.
  • It is a language, and message that has been adapted to my client. It must be both creative and timely to allow the recipient to get excited. It is important to use action verbs in the message that create urgency. There must also be a hook – a unique value proposition.
  • It’s sometimes nice to include the first name of the sender in the subject so that the recipient knows it’s an individual message.

 

Text preview

It may be useful to clients who use Gmail, Outlook, and iPhone mail. This preview shows the first few lines in the email. This is the continuation of your subject line.

Write under 50 characters. What will happen if we do not use it? We don’t want the body of the message to be displayed in an unorganized way.

 

Content

Include at least one image to make your readers happy and to motivate them to continue reading. Include the image as a header or in the body of the email.

Add links to images to increase their likelihood of reaching your destination.

Include a CTA to prevent your email from becoming a dead-end. This will help it reach the goal we set and prevent readers from “bouncing” (no engagement occurs).

Avoid using shortened links if you don’t want your email to end up in the spam folder after you spend time configuring and writing it. Link directly to the URL.

Add custom elements. This will make your readers feel as if a friend was talking to them, and it will reflect attention and closeness. Include social buttons to extend the life of your email.

 

Signature

This is the part of the mail that will make it very clear who you and your company are. It makes it easy for people to want to contact you.

It is important to keep your colors simple and consistent. Choose the information you wish to display using a hierarchy. Include a button to take action and social media buttons.

 

Adapt email to mobile devices

More than  80% of people access their emails from their mobile at the very least once a month. We must therefore adapt our emails to reach this large audience.

We have two recommendations. Reduce the size to compensate for slower devices and ensure that CTA buttons and links are bigger than 45-57 pixels.

This habit will save you headaches and keep your customers happy. Contact us at Digital Specialist, and our email marketing experts will help you to build an effective strategy.

hn yyvgcf

You may also like

Comments are closed.

More in Business